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ribanbel
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« Reply #15 on: September 30, 2010, 05:09:36 PM »

SARA RAMIREZ LOVES PLAYING “CALLIE” ON “GREY’S”



The chemistry between Dr. Callie Torres (Sara Ramirez) and her girlfriend, Dr. Arizona Robbins (Jessica Capshaw) is one of Grey’s Anatomy’s strongest facets.  In last week’s season premiere episode, Callie asked the commitment phobic Arizona shocked1 to move in with her, and that natural progression might put a damper on their relationship. Callie’s strong desire to have a baby strongly conflicted with Arizona’s priorities, and the couple spent most of last season bickering.  Ramirez credits Grey’s Anatomy’s writing staff for turning the stubborn doctors into a believable couple.  “The writers have found a really brilliant way to bring a very human relationship and a story that reflects the real world out there to a show in a way that is romantic, that is sexy that is thoughtful that has universal messages in all relationships,” says Ramirez.  Click on the media bar to hear Ramirez talk about Grey’s Anatomy, which airs on ABC tonight at 9 pm et/pt.

audio here Smiley
http://www.hollywoodoutbreak.com/2010/09/30/sara-ramirez-loves-playing-callie-on-greys/
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« Reply #16 on: October 02, 2010, 06:24:29 AM »

When Sara Ramirez isn’t repairing broken bones or melting your heart as out doctor Callie Torres on Grey’s Anatomy, she’s busy looking out for your liver through the Al D. Rodriguez Liver Foundation, a nonprofit organization in which she serves as a board member.Created and named after the loss of her “gay husband” and best friend, Ramirez is equally passionate about liver health as she is for gay rights. Ahead of Monday’s inaugural Broadway Takes the Runway: An Evening of Fashion and Song fundraiser — in which the Tony winner will take the stage and sing show tunes — AfterEllen.com caught up with Ramirez to talk about her philanthropy, gay rights and, yes, what’s next for primetime’s leading lesbian couple.

AfterEllen.com: What does it feel like to be adored by countless lesbians?
Sara Ramirez: (Laughs.) It feels awesome! Hey, look, it’s love. It doesn’t matter who it’s from. I am proud to play Callie Torres, I am proud of the story line, I really love the GLBT community and it’s a part of my life. I grew up in New York and it’s my friends and family and I love them back.

AE: Where does your support for gay rights come from?
SR: I moved to New York when I was about 17. I started my theater world experience in San Diego — I went to a performing arts school from fourth through 12th grade — and with the artistic folks that I was surrounded by, I had a lot of gay friends. I had a lot of gay folks around me growing up. It wasn’t a secret and it wasn’t anything anyone was particularly ashamed about. When I was around these people, I wasn’t introduced to it in some guilty, weird, shameful way, which I’m really grateful for. I went to Juilliard and I was surrounded by artists.

Then I graduated and quickly moved into the theater world, met Al (Rodriguez), who became my best friend right away. It’s always been a part of my life. It’s the world that I live in, it’s the world that I know and love. It’s what I’ve always been around and known. To me, because I’ve experienced that kind of life, it’s always interesting when you meet people who have had the absolute opposite experience and haven’t been around that or it’s so foreign. What ever other people feel, it’s always really interesting to me.

I hope with this story line and with Callie’s journey and the relationship with Arizona that we can just blow the top off of it and be like, “This is the world we live in.” There are several interesting walks of life that we’re talking about here. Arizona’s a character that’s always known that she’s a lesbian; Callie has only dated and been in love with men and now she’s understanding that she can also love and be with a woman. I think that’s an interesting walk of life, too, which is not necessarily the “I was born a lesbian, I’ve always known I was a lesbian.” It’s just as important to tell that story, too.

AE: What are your thoughts on the current state of lesbian visibility on TV?
SR: I think it’s getting better. I hate to say it, but unfortunately in this day and age in Hollywood when things are fashionable, suddenly you start to see it pop up everywhere. I feel like it’s popping up everywhere more and more. We had The L Word, obviously; we had a lot of shows in Hollywood that were trying, like Queer Eye for the Straight Guy. I remember back in the day when it was The Real World on MTV and there was a gay character.

In terms of specifically lesbian characters, The L Word was really the first show that showcased that and since then Grey’s Anatomy and we’ve seen several primetime TV shows try to incorporate lesbian characters into their shows and even pilots, I feel like it’s become almost mandatory in a way. I’m hopeful and I’m grateful that people are starting to realize how important it is to have a well-represented show and a cast that really represents the world that we live in.

AE: When I spoke with Jessica Capshaw in August, she mentioned she sees Callie and Arizona as “the beginning” of a new series of political couples on primetime who happen to be lesbians. What do you think?
SR: That is true. Because of my personal experience, I was really thrilled several seasons ago when I first asked (Grey’s Anatomy creator) Shonda Rhimes that if she were going to have a female character on this show go down the gay road, I really would love for it to be Callie and I’m totally up for taking that on. That’s when we started with the Dr. Erica Hahn (Brooke Smith) character. That’s when all that started.

The whole idea of bringing a relationship between two women to primetime TV without commenting on it was something that developed many seasons ago, back when Brooke Smith was on the show. It’s something that I’m really proud of. Unfortunately or fortunately — however you want to look at it — it went down the road that it went down. But the good news is that the writers and Shonda Rhimes and everyone I think, I hope at least, really made a point not to comment on it as much as just letting the relationship play out as a relationship with universal issues — some not so universal that were kind of dealt with through a lot of sense of humor, in terms of a woman never having been with another woman and wanting so much to please her. There were a lot of things that were tackled many seasons ago that were set up in a way where we don’t have to comment on it while at the same time making a huge impact. For that I’m really grateful to Shonda and the writers for really making an effort.

It’s really great how things have evolved, and now in this relationship — Callie’s second with a woman — we’re really seeing how two strong women with very different personalities learn to navigate and negotiate through all of the very common things that we go through in relationships. It’s fun to see them tackle all that and grow together and grow as individual people because of it.

AE: How political would you like to see Grey’s get with Callie and Arizona’s story line — marriage equality?
SR: With everything going on with Prop. 8 and the fact that it is still this ridiculous battle, it would be so fantastic if it all just got squashed and went away but at the same time we saw Callie and Arizona move on to the next level, whether it was having a child or getting married and having it be legal. Stuff like that I think would be fantastic.

Again, representing the world that we live in, two of my guy friends got married right when it was still legal here in California, right before it became an issue again. The joy that I saw in their faces is something that you never forget. It is a part of the world that I live in and I want to see everyone be that happy and everyone feel that protected and equal. Everybody is deserving. I think it would be great for Grey’s Anatomy to go down that road, absolutely.

AE: Last season ended with Arizona saying she was open to having kids with Callie. How would you like to see that happen?
SR: We’re starting the season off with a lot of huge promises that were made. The shooter comes into the hospital and reminds everybody how short life can be. People, out of this really traumatic life experience, start to realize how precious life is and how much they really love the person they’re with and what they’re willing to sacrifice to be with them — including their own dreams, which I think is interesting. Callie’s dream is to have a baby and she gave it up and said, “I will not have children if it means I’ll be with you because I’d rather be with you.” Then Arizona, on the flip side, goes, “We’ll have 10 children, we’ll have a family, what ever you want, I love you, and I want to be with you.”

Now we’re starting the season off with it’s not really talked about, we don’t really touch on the baby issue but we do start to see the progression of two people who have said to each other that we’re going to be together, we’re going to build a life together. In the first episode this season, Callie asks her to move in and she says yes and it’s great. In the next episode, you see them deal with — in a hilarious way — when you say you’re going to move in together and you don’t realize what you got into until you move in together and then you realize, “Oh, hey, you’ve got some habits, some needs and wants and they’re very different from mine.” You’ll see a very humorous side of that and that’s what we’re going to be dealing with first: the slow progression of them building a life together.

Then in terms of having a baby, if they go down that road, obviously you’re going to need a sperm donor. Then the question becomes how they look into that. Is there going to be a Private Practice crossover? I think that would be kind of neat. Where do you start looking first and who do you pick? Is Mark Sloan (Eric Dane) going to be involved somehow? What are the boundaries around that? Is that going to provide some conflict? I see potential in all of that, but I’m not the writer. (Laughs.) But I think there’s a lot of potential for some really interesting stuff that could really ruffle everyone’s feathers in a really fabulous way that keeps people interested.

AE: What did you think of the whole Newsweek debacle?
SR: I think it’s ridiculous. It’s offensive. It undermines actors’ abilities. It’s what we do; actors and performers are constantly stepping into people that they’re nothing like and I think sexual orientation should not be the deciding factor as to whether you get to play a role or not. There are plenty of actors out there who are portraying straight characters in an amazing way and the actors happen to be homosexual. Neil Patrick Harris is a perfect example of someone who is a smart, funny, talented, classy, hilarious, silly, loving person and oh yeah, by the way, he’s gay. Who cares?

I think T.R. Knight (who played George on Grey’s) said it best when he first came out to the public that it’s the least interesting thing about him. He said that, those are his words. I thought that was brilliant. Because for a lot of people who want to come out and kids who don’t know what to do about telling their parents in the Midwest that they’re gay, I think that it is scary and it does matter and it is interesting. I don’t want kids to think that it’s the least interesting thing about you; no, it’s fabulous! Celebrate it, be yourself, be who you are, be out about it. But it is scary and it is frightening.

In terms of actors and performers who happen to be gay, yeah, it’s the least interesting thing. It’s just as interesting as who a straight person sleeps with — I don’t care. I don’t need to know about that. All I need to know is when you show up for work you’re prepared, you know your lines and you’ve got your character down and you’re going to have fun and do a great job. That you’re going to convince people that you’re playing that role and it’s going to be believable and it’s going to be real. If somebody doesn’t portray a role well, it’s perhaps because they weren’t prepared enough or it wasn’t the right role for them. It has nothing to do with their sexual orientation.


AE: Is there a specific project that would get you to return to Broadway?
SR: A dream role of mine is “Evita,” but it might be far-fetched because I’m very tall and I’m not a trained dancer. But I’m working on it! (Laughs.) I would love to do Evita. It’d be a great and very difficult role. It’s a tall order and I’m scaring myself saying it out loud. That role speaks to me. If I were to come back and do an original piece it would have to be a piece that speaks to my heart, has amazing music. Lin-Manuel Miranda — who wrote and starred in In the Heights — I would love to work with him and develop something with him.

AE: What will you be singing at “Broadway Takes the Runway: An Evening of Fashion and Song”?
SR: I’m going to be singing a song from Evita that I’m really excited about. And I’ll be singing a song from The Secret Garden. Four-time Tony Award-winner Audra McDonald, who also is on Private Practice, is going to be singing, too. Plus Billy Porter and Natalie Weiss, Christopher Jackson and Robin de Jesus and Carson Kressley, who’s on the board, will be hosting.

AE: How did the Al D. Rodriguez Liver Foundation get started?
SR: We’ve been around for two years. Al was my best friend and he moved out to L.A. with me when I got “Grey’s Anatomy” and he moved back right before Season 3. A couple years ago he was diagnosed with liver cancer out of the blue. He was 45-years old and had no insurance. He was an actor, a gay man — he was my gay husband. It turns out he had contracted hepatitis in high school from eating something and it’s scary that it went untreated the whole time.

There was a lot of confusion around it and it was just too late. It turned into liver cirrhosis, which turned into liver cancer. Six weeks later he passed away. Nothing prepares you for that kind of stuff.

The last couple years I’ve been going through the grief process and the foundation was something that was brought up by one of the group’s friends around Al who said we should do a foundation in his memory and try to give back and help those in need like him. We all decided to do it and move our energy into something productive that gives back and celebrates his memory. We’ve managed to screen people and vaccinate people for hepatitis.

That’s really our goal: To provide free screening for the hepatitis virus and free vaccinations. We’re targeting community health centers and clinics, we’re trying to focus on communities that reflect who Al was — an artist, a gay man, someone without insurance, a Latino. We’re being very specific right now but we do hope and want to help as many people as we can.

AE: How can people get involved if they can’t attend the event in New York?
SR: Donate, it doesn’t have to be a lot — it can be a little bit every now and then

Also, forward the information and the website to anyone that you know who might have hepatitis or who thinks they might have it or who has a liver issue.

Really, education around the liver organ is really important. What’s really ironic is that Al never drank alcohol. People often associate liver issues with alcohol, which yes, they exist. But there’s a whole other side of the liver being affected by other things that are non-alcohol related. It’s important to get the message out that there are many ways that your liver can deteriorate so it’s important to understand its function and that when something goes terribly wrong you often don’t find out until it’s too late.

People can reach out and help educate others. We have honorary board members, people who are linked to the medical world who help us out all the time who contribute resources and the latest medical discoveries so if people have connections to that, that’s great. People can get involved in all sorts of ways but more than anything we would love for people to go on the website and contact us and let us know that they would like to contribute and help and we can work together to think of ways. (Source | After Ellen)
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ribanbel
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« Reply #17 on: October 02, 2010, 10:46:57 AM »

wonderful interview of Sara Smiley Smiley Smiley
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« Reply #18 on: October 03, 2010, 05:16:37 AM »

Another great one (from NYMag):

Sara Ramirez has played Grey’s Anatomy‘s resident orthopedic surgeon Callie Torres since the long-running doctor drama’s second season. In that time, Callie’s fallen in love, gotten married, been cheated on, gotten divorced, been promoted, been demoted, had her ex-husband die, become a lesbian, and in last season’s finale, witnessed a mass killing at the hospital. At the beginning of Grey’s seventh season, we spoke with Ramirez about the show, how it’s recovered from last season’s backstage drama, how much she likes blood and guys, and if the Tony-award-winning actress still finds time to sing.

Grey’s ended last season on an upswing, and two episodes into the seventh season it’s better than it has been in a long while. Does it feel like things are going well?

We came off of a real high from last season’s finale. It was intense. People were really affected and were on the edge of their seat from the feedback I got, and I think everybody walked away proud from that episode. I was curious to see how this new season would start and, of course, we premiered and we premiered very well, I’m happy to say. And that’s thrilling in your seventh season.

Do you guys pay a lot of attention to the ratings?
Well, I won’t speak for everybody, but I know I’m aware and I know some other actors are aware, and writers. There’s an awareness, because you care and you want the show to do well. We care about our jobs and about the longevity. I know I do. I love my gig, and I want it to be around for a long time.

After all of the backstage drama last year, does it feel like things have calmed down?
Honestly, I’ve personally been on my own page for the last couple of years, grieving for my best friend. He was diagnosed with liver cancer when he was 45 and he died six weeks later. So I was navigating the various processes of getting out of bed and going to work, and I really couldn’t take on more than that. All I can say is that personally, this season, something shifted for me during the hiatus after season sic and my grief is in a new place, so I myself feel lighter this year. I myself am showing up to work feeling different. And yes, time has gone by and we have new cast members and there’s been a big shift over at Seattle Grace-Mercy West, so you feel that. You take that in, and it’s energy that revitalizes and energizes the show.

What’s Callie going to be doing this season?
She’s going to start doing more surgeries. There are some more surgeries coming up that I was so psyched to be a part of, because I am totally into, like, medical bloody, bloody, blood and guts operations. I’m, like, so not nauseated by that stuff at all. My father was an oceanographer. I saw specimens in jars in a laboratory all the time growing up — like, it doesn’t faze me. The only thing that fazes me is when animals are hurt; that’s when I get freaked out. That’s what I can’t handle, but a big cut-open dead body? I’m good to go.

How realistic are the bodies you operate on on the show?
The stuff looks so real, down to the hairs on the arms. We all just kind of admire the amazing jobs the prosthetic team does. But I’m totally not grossed out. I want to pick it apart and look at it.

Do you have much input into what Callie’s arc is?
TV is a writers’ medium. I’m not gonna lie. At the same time, our writers are always open to conversation about characters. There’s a lot of open communication, which feels really good and I think that has developed over time. It’s always kind of been there, but when Grey’s was going through some rough times, it was like okay, nobody really knew where the boundaries were. Now it feels a lot more open.

Do you think that if Callie and Arizona broke up, that at this point Callie would stay a lesbian?
I don’t know. I feel like Callie is sort of wrapped up in her current relationship. I think that if something were to go wrong, I guess she would have to reassess why that happened, like many of us do. You reassess why that happened and you would I guess come back to yourself, right? But I don’t think with Callie that it matters whether it’s a guy or a girl. It’s more about the essence of the person or the spirit of a person. But people are really invested in Callie and Arizona. I get like, “Oh my God, Callie, you and Arizona, you guys like have to have babies. You have to get married, oh my God.” There’s a lot of people out there that feel represented by Callie’s journey and people that feel represented by Arizona’s journey. There’s a lot of like women out there that have written to me and said, “Thank you. I was able to come out to my parents and my boyfriend” or whatever.

You have this musical-theater background, but you don’t sing on Grey’s, obviously. Do you find other ways to perform?
I’m actually performing at this benefit in New York on Monday with a bunch of great people for the friend that I mentioned earlier, so I’ve been rehearsing for that. I’ve had to sing a little bit lately for some other things, which is good because you’ve got to get the muscles working again. You don’t want to hurt yourself.

Do you miss New York when you’re not here?
I do. I was just talking with someone the other day, and I was finally admitting that I live in L.A. and that I’m a West Coaster right now. I lived in New York for fourteen years, and when I moved out here it took several years to get grounded, and then my best friend passed and since then it’s been hard to go back to New York, and I don’t really get out there more than once or twice a year. It’s really tough. But I have a house here, a car, my new friends, and my new life, but I do miss New York. Everybody there is so real, you know? And people in New York, it’s not all about the industry. It’s so refreshing when people can talk about other things. You’re standing on the same subway platform as the person with the Prada shoes. It doesn’t matter where you live or how much money you have, you’re all going to ride the same subway, and there’s something about that I just love.
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Big plans. Big plans. You know what? I don't care. I've got big plans myself. Great big African plans!
ribanbel
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« Reply #19 on: October 03, 2010, 08:59:14 AM »

thank you Sara and CQ Cheesy
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ribanbel
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« Reply #20 on: October 05, 2010, 11:26:02 AM »

'Grey's' star: 'Fans care about Callie'
Monday, October 4 2010, 10:17am EDT


Grey's Anatomy star Sara Ramirez has revealed that fans are "invested" in the romance between Callie and Arizona.

Speaking to New York Magazine, Ramirez admitted that she is not sure about Callie's sexuality.

"I feel like Callie is sort of wrapped up in her current relationship," she said. "I think that if something were to go wrong, I guess she would have to reassess why that happened, like many of us do. You reassess why that happened and you would I guess come back to yourself, right?

"But I don't think with Callie that it matters whether it's a guy or a girl. It's more about the essence of the person or the spirit of a person."

Ramirez added that fans have strong feelings about Callie's romance on the show.

"People are really invested in Callie and Arizona," she said. "I get like, 'Oh my God, Callie, you and Arizona, you guys like have to have babies. You have to get married, oh my God'. There's a lot of people out there that feel represented by Callie's journey and people that feel represented by Arizona's journey. There's a lot of women out there that have written to me and said, 'Thank you, I was able to come out to my parents and my boyfriend' or whatever."

Ramirez also revealed that she is looking forward to Callie taking part in more operations this season.

"There are some more surgeries coming up that I was so psyched to be a part of, because I am totally into medical bloody, bloody, blood and guts operations," she confessed. "I'm so not nauseated by that stuff at all."

http://www.digitalspy.com/ustv/s46/greys-anatomy/news/a280194/greys-star-fans-care-about-callie.html
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ribanbel
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« Reply #21 on: October 12, 2010, 01:01:33 PM »

it's not Sara herself in an interview but Sarah Drew on our lovely Sara Cheesy


Is there anyone in the cast that you have become particularly close to since your arrival?

Yes, a few people.  Sara for sure.  Sara Ramirez, when I came back to the show she was like, " Oh my gosh, I'm so glad you're back!"  and she was just so excited to have my new energy there on the set.  It made me feel like a billion bucks.  She's also just hilarious and fun, and we've had some really fun moments on set.  We've also had some really deep discussions on set.  I really love her.  I don't work with her as much as I work with some of the other people, but I adore her.

http://www.popstar.com/News/Shows/Article/652
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« Reply #22 on: January 28, 2011, 03:06:01 PM »

CHECK THIS OUT!!!  Smiley
http://www.thisischeshire.co.uk/news/8820529.Interview_with_Sara_Ramirez__who_plays_Dr_Callie_Torres_in_Grey_s_Anatomy/
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"Because she was standing up for what she believed in!" (Callie Torres)

CQ
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« Reply #23 on: February 07, 2011, 02:32:35 PM »

Behind the scenes @ Latina: http://sara-ramirez.org/news-rumors/latina-video/

Can't wait for the interview! Here's the cover and some quotes:



Grey’s Anatomy star Sara Ramirez discusses life, love, loss, body issues and sexuality as she graces the March cover of Latina magazine, which hits newsstands next week.

In her first in-depth interview in years, the Mexican-American actress opens up about ...

Battling depression: At one point, Ramirez says, she was feeling so down, she could barely muster up the energy to get out of bed and go to the set of Grey’s Anatomy.
“Somehow I managed to do it, but it wasn’t pretty. There were days that I would show up to work and come out the side of my face to people who didn’t deserve it.”

Body issues: “There’s a whole list of things you could worry about. Are you skinny enough? Talented enough? In all kinds of ways, I used to be really hard on myself.”

Being different: “I’ve never been very cookie cutter. If I choose something different from the status quo, it’s my responsibility and my choice to live my life that way.”

Tumultuous times on Grey’s Anatomy: “I found myself in the midst of a hurricane. So much time on Grey’s Anatomy was spent simply trying to figure out what kind of family I was walking into. There was so much drama, so much time wasted focusing on the wrong things.”

(source: tvfanatic and sara-ramirez.org)
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Big plans. Big plans. You know what? I don't care. I've got big plans myself. Great big African plans!
ribanbel
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« Reply #24 on: February 08, 2011, 11:35:41 AM »

hot damn Sara Embarrassed Embarrassed

ok I'll leave it at that whistle

glad she is feeling great in her skin and is over the depression Wink
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ribanbel
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« Reply #25 on: February 12, 2011, 02:59:14 PM »

enjoy the clip of the gorgeous Sara Cheesy

"and whether or not that's the right person for her or not and right now she is in a relationship with a woman"  confused suspious

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-1356188/Greys-Anatomy-star-Sara-Ramirez-shows-curves-sexy-photoshoot.html
« Last Edit: February 12, 2011, 03:05:26 PM by ribanbel » Logged
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